Month: September 2012

The Cost of Education

Education is priceless. But what happens when you put a real price on education? (I’m not talking about yearbooks and locker fees.)  For 12-year-old Chefor Fritz in Cameroon, he spent the summer selling onions to earn money to go to secondary school. If he does not raise the money, he will not be able to go to school. Read more about the children in Cameroon in this article: “Schoolchildren in Cameroon Hawk Goods to Raise Money for New School Year” But education does not always mean school. Education can come through vocational training programs, literacy, and various other facets. For Siphosethu Ndlovu in Zimbabwe, she never went to school. She is disabled and has spent her life, isolated, barely getting by. When she was 10, her uncle took her to the streets and taught her to beg. Because of the social stigma that comes with disabilities, she has always had a lack of educational opportunities. But, the time she spent isolated in her home and on the streets, she has acquired a self-taught talent to sew …

More Than Me

We at Girls’ Globe believe that we all have a difference to make in this world. We are driven by the passion we have for the people we meet and the dream to really make a difference in somebody’s life and to play a part in changing the world. We can’t stay quiet when hearing about the atrocities against mankind in conflict and oppression, the injustice against women and girls in many parts of our societies, and the ignorance that we also meet regarding the situation of so many people in our world. There are a lot of statistics and stories that we can share with you, and we will continue to do so. We want to inform to empower and educate to inspire action. But today, I want to share a video of a woman with passion, a woman who is working to change the lives of girls in Liberia. She was driven by a purpose and she decided that what she had to do is “More Than Me”. Katie Myler is the Founder …

GEMS: Fighting Domestic Trafficking One Girl at a Time

When most of us think about trafficking, we think about it on an international scale, right? What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear (or read) the word “trafficking?” How about stories of girls being transported across Southeast Asian borders to work in brothels or young Chinese children whose parents think they are sending their child off to a better life, ending up enslaved in America paying off a never-ending ‘debt’ in restaurants and nail salons? Or what about the major feature films like ‘Taken’ and ‘Trade’ (both awesome movies, by the way) that you’ve seen trailers for on TV or watched on Netflix? These grotesque, global escapades catch people’s attention. The thought of a person being transported across borders, oceans, continents to an unknown land where they ‘disappear’ underground is a chilling thought to anyone. But, what we don’t hear and think about as much is that trafficking isn’t just an international issue, it’s domestic, too. That’s a really scary thought. How about the fact that it could happen to people …

What if you couldn’t read?

793 million, nearly one in five adults, cannot read. Two-thirds of those that cannot read are women and girls. 67 million children live without access to primary education. Reading is the key to inclusion, empowerment, and to improving quality of life. The importance of literacy extends beyond the ability to read and write. it is critically linked to poverty, conflict and instabiliy, and health and food security crises. Check this out: Have you heard about All Children Reading: The Grand Challenge for Development? Watch this video: You can watch additional videos from All Children Reading here. International Literacy Day was September 8. What are you doing to find solutions to advance reading and literacy? How do you promote education? What if you couldn’t read? Join the discussion on Twitter with the hashtag #giveeducation and #allchildrenreading. …oh and don’t forget, the documentary, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide is being released in just 18 days on PBS…the countdown is on! Are you as excited as we are? Don’t forget to watch the …

Virginity Testing: Violating the Rights of Women

Virginity testing. It just sounds bad, doesn’t it? Unpleasant, violating and humiliating. Just a few of the words that come to mind when I think about what it must be like to be subjected to a virginity test. You can probably guess what the whole point to the test it: to test to see if a woman or girl is still a virgin. Another way of looking at it is that it’s a test to see whether the female has had premarital sex. Virginity testing is widely practiced throughout the Middle East, Northern Africa and a few other African countries. Although virginity testing has been a practice for a long time, it received the most attention during the Arab Spring, when Egyptian women protesters reported being given the ‘virginity test’ against their will by military forces after being arrested for protesting against the Egyptian government. For many women living in these areas, it is just a part of life. The testing process is completely invasive and not at all reliable no matter what method is used …

Girls and Education: The Power to Change a Community

Education is powerful. In my mind, it is the key to development. In the words of The World Bank: “Educating girls is one of the strongest ways not only to improve gender equality, but to promote economic growth and the healthy development of families, communities and nations.” It has proven to be one of the most effective ways to fight poverty. When I talk about education, I am not just speaking of primary and secondary school but of education in nutrition, feminine hygiene, disease, vocational training, and many other important issues. Education is a vital investment. With additional education, girls receive more job opportunities and higher wages. Girls that attend school are also less likely to engage in crime or become a victim of human trafficking. They are more likely to marry later and have few children. I love the thoughts of Sakena Yacoobi, Founder and Executive Director of the Afghan Institute of Learning, on this issue: Of the 75 million primary school-age children around the world that are not in school, more than half are girls. Boys …