Month: November 2012

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Highlighting: CODE RED for Gender Justice, on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

  CODE RED for Gender Justice is a Caribbean feminist activist collective, raising awareness and providing opportunities for regional collaboration on issues of gender justice. Our activities aim to bring a plurality of critical feminist voices to everything from politics and economics to gender and sexualities in our global world. Source Whether writing about mainstream news stories through a feminist lens or sharing inspiring stories of women and girls around the world, CODE RED carves out a space for Caribbean feminists in the dialogue and activism surrounding gender equality. Beginning as a student organization at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, Barbados; CODE RED now has an international reach.  The organization’s work includes an annual Symposium to nurture emerging feminist scholars and activists from the Caribbean, and the creation of the CatchAFyah Caribbean Feminist Network working towards gender equity and women’s rights. Issues that receive critical analysis from the CODE RED writers include sexism and sexual violence in society, news media and pop culture.  A recent article “Kick in She Back Door: Violence …

People joining the manifestation on the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

7 in 10 women and girls are victims of violence

Today is the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. Around the world people are coming together to take a stand and say NO to violence against women. In Malmö, Sweden, a peaceful protest against violence against women was organized by several organizations active in the region to support women who have been victims to domestic and gender-based violence. I was invited to speak on behalf of Girls’ Globe, and here is what I had to say on this day: —————————— Violence against women is a violation of women’s human rights. It is one of the world’s most neglected public health issues, and one of the world’s largest socioeconomic problems. And violence against women is the strongest form of discrimination against women. According to UN Women, 7 out of 10 women and girls are victims of violence sometime in their lifetime. And violence occurs in many different forms. It is estimated that a majority of the world’s women will be a violated by a partner some time during their lives. Domestic violence often …

The Indian Enigma - Mumbai

The Indian Enigma

India is home to one of the world’s fastest growing economies.  With a real GDP growth rate of 7.20 percent, India’s GDP purchasing power parity has risen to now serve as the fourth wealthiest state, behind only the European Union, the United States, and China. Growth in the country’s agricultural sector contributed for up to 21 percent of the GDP in 2011; however, this figure likely underestimates the sector’s importance as many rural poor households depend on the rain-fed agriculture and forestry for their livelihoods.  Although India’s economic gains should be good news for all those living within its borders, an unfortunate disconnect has recently taken shape that demonstrates the harsh remaining gender inequities. In 2011, the World Economic Forum (WEF) released its annual Global Gender Gap Report, demonstrating the state of gender inequalities around the world. From 2006 to 2011, India consistently fell in its gender equality rank in categories such as economic participation, educational attainment and health and survival.  By 2011, India ranked at 113th of 135 countries and now stands as one …

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Women & Water

Women and water have a very unique relationship. It’s not something that’s very obvious unless you do your research on how the two are associated. In many parts of the world, especially developing countries, water plays a big role in women’s lives. Take a look at these figures on women and water: On average, women and girls travel 10-15 kilometres per round trip to a water source; Each day women and girls worldwide spend 152 million work hours collecting water for their families; Women carry up to 15 litres of water per trip; Surveys in 45 developing countries showed that women and girls were responsible for the collection of water for 76% of households; Women and girls in sub-Saharan Africa spend 40 billion hours each year walking to collect water. For many households, the women and girls are responsible for the collection of water that will be used for cooking, cleaning, drinking, sanitation and hygiene. This would be simple if the houses were hooked up to accessible and clean water systems, but as the statistics …

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Central American Women Organizing for Change

The poor working conditions for women in factories or maquilas located in Central American Export Procesing Zones (EPZs) are no secret: Long hours, often with forced overtime; no medical insurance or care for workplace injuries; and barely enough in earnings to live above the poverty line. Women and girls, some as young as 11 years old, are specifically recruited because of their perceived docility and obedience. But what is less well known, are the stories of women advocating for the labour rights of women and girls working in these EPZs and making progress.  Within Central America, this movement not only involves campaigning for changes to laws and workplace practices that are harmful to women, but building the capacity of individuals and groups of women to be community leaders.  The short documentary “Pushing Back: Women Workers Speak Out on Trade” features women from Honduras discussing working conditions in factories and the work being done to empower women and change labour standards: CODEMUH,  (Honduran Women’s Collective) CODEMUH has been working towards women’s empowerment and securing worker’s rights in Honduras …