Economics & Politics, Gender Equality
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Women Make Up Less Than 10 Percent Of Speakers At Argentina’s Investment Forum

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Post written by Emily Hersh

Men. Lots and lots of men with barely a woman in sight. No, we’re not talking about Friday night at any of the clubs on the Costanera, but rather the hallways during the first two days of the Argentina Business & Investment Forum. President Mauricio Macri’s government used the event to try to sell Argentina to the world, and it seems the message to investors was loud and clear: those who make the rules in the country are men.

The Bubble crunched the numbers and turns out that a mere 23 women were on stage during one of the multitude of sessions that were held over Tuesday and Wednesday at the Centro Cultural Kirchner. The number of men? 191. That means women made up less than 11 percent of people given a strong voice at the forum.

These numbers are inflated by the unusually high representation of women as moderators. There’s nothing wrong with being a moderator, of course, but the very nature of the job means it is someone asking questions rather than having answers. Of the 15 participants who were solely listed as moderators, six were women (anyone who participated in another capacity during the forum was not included in this count).

That means there were a total of 17 women who spoke as experts in their respective fields, compared to 184 men. So, when you take moderators out of the mix, the number of women who spoke at the forum amounted to a paltry nine percent.

The lack of women at business forums is the stuff of legend, and has given rise to many internet memes but less than 10 percent seems to be low even by the low standards of business sectors in which men are still clearly in charge.

Without further ado, here are the 23 women who spoke at the two-day forum:

  1. Lisa Davis: Member of the Managing Board of Siemes AG
  2. Carolina Florez: Human Resources Vice President at Oracle Latin America
  3. Jane Fraser: CEO of Latin America, Citi Group
  4. Paloma Herrera: American Ballet Prima Donna
  5. Donna Hrinak: President, Latin America, Boeing
  6. Felicitas Pizarro: Chef
  7. Carla Rebecchi, Captain, Las Leonas national hockey team, Argentina
  8. Marina Dal Poggetto: Director, estudio Bein & Asociados
  9. Marina Díaz IBarra: Country Manager, MercadoLibre
  10. Pamela Correani: Legal and International Relations for Plan Belgrano, Argentina’s Cabinet
  11. Alicia Ciciliani: Member of congress from the province of Santa Fe,
  12. Isela Costantini: CEO Aerolíneas Argentinas
  13. Manuela Lopez Menendez: Secretary of Works, Ministry of Transportation
  14. Cate Ambrose: President & Executive Director, Latin American Private Equity & Venture Capital Association
  15. Cecilia Boufflet: Business and Economics Journalist, TV Pública
  16. Patricia Janiot: Senior Anchor, CNN en Español
  17. Fiona Mackie: Regional Manager Latin America and the Caribbean, The Economist Intelligence Unit
  18. María O’Donnell: Journalist and author, Radio Continental
  19. Susan Segal: President & CEO, American Society/Council of the Americas
  20. Susana Malcorra, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Worship
  21. Gabriela Michetti, Vice President of Argentina
  22. María Eugenia Vidal, Governor of the Province of Buenos Aires
  23. Clarisa Estol: Secretary for Investment Promotion, Minister of Communications

 

This post was originally featured on The Bubble and was reposted here with permission from the author, Emily Hersh. Photo: The Bubble.

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