Author: Grace J Wong

Five Feminist Resolutions for 2017

2017 has already proven to be a tough year for feminists. And we can expect to be tried and tested for the many months to come. As we look to the coming battles, here are five feminist New Year’s resolutions: 1. Show up After more than four million feminists showed up for the Women’s March on Washington and the 300+ sister marches globally, it is safe to say we are getting good at this one. But, it is crucial we continue to show up for what we believe in. Whether that be to continue marching, or to meet other feminists in your city, or to support feminist films, books, and concerts. While social media is an incredibly powerful tool to link the global community, cultivating a physical community is equally important and special. In 2017, let’s make sure we are there for our fellow females, and remember that together we are stronger. 2. Volunteer Alongside showing up for events, protests, and meet-ups, we must continue to support the incredible work of Planned Parenthood, ACLU, National …

Speak Out: A Million Women’s Voices

As we welcome in the new year, we also welcome a new family to the White House. On January 20th Donald Trump will be inaugurated the 45th President of the United States and it is scary. Throughout the campaign season and the weeks since the election, feminist communities around the nation have rallied together in a collective outcry against Donald Trump. In the past eighteen months we have seen him call women fat, ugly, pigs, dogs, losers, slobs, disgusting animals, and pieces of ass. We have seen him poke fun at menstruation and support lawmakers who want to take away our rights to our bodies. But we have not been silent. From blogs to Planned Parenthood donations, from art installations to painful conversations, we are building community. And for many Americans, that means joining the January 21st Women’s March on Washington where millions of women and allies will take to the streets in protest against the rhetoric of misogyny, homophobia, racism, and xenophobia perpetuated by our current President Elect. But what about the millions of …

Six Superb STEMinists You Need to Meet

When I think of famous women in STEM, Marie Curie immediately comes to mind, but I can’t think of too many after that. For a girl to succeed in STEM fields, she needs support and she needs role models. These six women are currently working in STEM fields ranging from outer-space to the science lab and even into the White House. “Environmental challenges have the power to deny equality of opportunity and hold back the progress of communities.”– Lisa P. Jackson Lisa P. Jackson is a chemical engineer who has devoted her life to protecting the environment as both a woman in STEM and politics. She worked at the EPA for sixteen years before joining the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and worked on land management rights. She became the Commissioner of Environmental Protection for New Jersey and focused on making sure generally ignored and disenfranchised communities had access to pollutant free air. And she reached out to multicultural communities to educate, inform and involve them in her environmental efforts. She was the head …

Women In Politics: Moving From the Periphery Toward Peace, Justice, & Strong Institutions

With our sights and Twitter feeds plugged into #2030NOW, the UN has amplified not only the Sustainable Development Goals but also asked us to consider the world we want to live in in 2030. Regardless of our political affiliations, government is highly influential in shaping our world and governance is reflective of societal norms and power dynamics. A low representation of women in government does not lend itself to the inclusive, transparent, and just governance systems we have pledged to achieve by 2030 via Sustainable Development Goal 16, which calls for Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions. In excluding women from government, women’s preferences, voices, and citizenship are all disempowered. However, women advocates, UN organizations and others have stepped up and voiced these concerns and are actively working to increase female participation in government. For example, UN Women’s primary goal is to empower women and girls and has used the platform of Goal 16 to elevate the importance of transparent, inclusive governance in empowerment. Their solution involves developing the capacity to conduct gender analysis, monitoring systems to track good …