All posts filed under: Millennium Development Goals

A Mother’s Keynote Address to Canadian Parliament

This speech was given by Faridah Luyiga Mwanje, Communication Officer with White Ribbon Alliance in Uganda, to the Canadian Parliament today, on the International Day of the Midwife.  I stand before you today as a woman, as a mother, as a citizen of Uganda and an advocate for reproductive health and rights. I am happy and honoured to be here, but a few years ago I never would have imagined that I would come to Canada to thank the Canadian Government and Canadian organizations for their continued investment in the health of women and children globally – and specially to talk about the realities faced by adolescents in my country. But my life changed forever when my own sister, Remie Wamala, died in childbirth in 2013. She bled to death at a hospital in Kampala leaving behind a heartbroken husband and four children. Her baby, my nephew, Lucky Wamala survived but suffered brain damage. Remie was only one of the 17 mothers and 106 newborns who still die every day during childbirth in Uganda. My sister was a mature married woman who worked for the government on …

MDG4 Progress: Saving Our Little Saviors

A nation’s future is built upon its children. Early childhood development is considered to be the most important phase which determines the overall wellbeing across the individual’s lifespan. Investing in children translates into saving our world from the countless ills that plague society today. 15 years ago, the world made a promise in the form of Millennium Development Goal 4 to reduce the global under-five mortality rate by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015 as our leaders agreed on the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We have now reached the end of the era of the MDGs, and the world has come together to make a new promise in the form of a new set of goals for the coming 15 years. In that respect, it is important to take a closer look at how well we did in our strive to uphold our promise; and approach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with a renewed sense of commitment. We should acknowledge that we have come a long way. According to the 2015 Levels and Trends in Child …

Girls’ Globe at UN General Assembly – Join us!

The 70th Session of the United Nations General Assembly formally began on 15 September 2015 – and this year is different and unique. This year, the world comes together to say goodbye to the eight Millennium Development Goals which were adopted in 1990 for 15 years, and say hello to the new 17 Sustainable Development Goals, which will set the new global development agenda for the entire world from now until 2030. Much can be said about the MDGs and whether or not they succeeded in what they set out to do – we’ve seen great success stories, and notable failures. We’ve learned about setting targets and defining indicators, and we’ve understood the importance of ensuring that we don’t only focus on countries reaching certain thresholds and targets, but also pay attention to whether their progress and development is even and equal and reaches those who are most in need, and often the hardest to reach. Girls’ Globe will be present at UNGA with our key partners, FHI360, Johnson & Johnson, and Women Deliver, focusing particularly on …

From MDGs to SDGs: Stepping into the World We Want

In Africa, there is a common phrase that says, “When the drummers change their beat, the dancers must change their steps.” In September, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are set to be adopted by Heads of States at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). This meeting will bring together developed and developing countries, politicians, private sector leaders, civil society organizations, faith groups and others to adopt a set of 17 goals that aim to  take forward the job that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set in motion by intensifying action to empower the poorest and the hardest to reach. Will the global community be dancing to a new beat that will truly be transformative and have a positive impact on the lives of women and girls or will the new development agenda play out like a broken record? The following are a few reflections of the proposed 2030 agenda: Looking Back – What Worked The MDGs have been praised for being useful tool in providing benchmarks for the achievement of special development gains, for priority …

Little BIG Africa: Water and Sanitation Post-2015

2015 is sure to be a historic year for girls and women.  Worldwide efforts are ensuring that they will be a focus of the next set of development goals, voices speaking out against FGM are growing louder, the Malala effect is continuing to spread, and child marriage is finally being given the global attention it deserves.   Amongst this positive momentum, it’s crucial that one area doesn’t get left behind – as it’s an issue that is already lagging in its progress.  Halving the number of people worldwide who do not have access to safe water and sanitation is the least on track of all Millennium Development Goals – according to a UN report published last year – and 2.5 billion people worldwide still lack basic facilities. The effect of this on females is colossal.  In communities where the responsibility for collecting water rests on the shoulders (or rather on the heads) of women and girl children, the task takes hours each day.  For girls, this means hours out of the classroom and hours at risk …