All posts filed under: Tech

Surround Yourself With Feminists

In places where access to information isn’t reliable, support groups and networks can play a hugely important role. In Mexico, as has been highlighted in previous posts, there is a gender-based problem that needs to be addressed. Among many things, such as security, access to education, sexual rights and health, access to information is one of the biggest problems for Mexico’s female population. It is inevitable to address religion when talking about women’s access to information here in Mexico – it’s the second largest Catholic population in the world, and although religion has proven to aid many people through personal or community issues, it definitely has an impact on the county’s public policy. Although Mexico claims to be a Lay State, it has been proven in the past that the reality is quite different. While this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, often when more  progressive policies have been pursued the conservative population has demonstrated their rejection. So, it is normal to expect that conservative opinions have influenced a lot of the institutions that should be safe spaces for women, men, the LGBTTI community and non-binaries. In no way …

Female Networks: Creating Magic by Getting Women Together

2017 might turn out to be the year of female networks. Are you part of any organised network, virtual or physical? I wasn’t, at least not actively, until last year when I joined a Swedish Facebook group for women only, Heja Livet. Nowadays, I seem to start every other sentence with “I saw this thing in that female network…”. When I joined, Heja Livet consisted of 1,500 young women. Today, not even a year later, we are over 24,000 women (you heard me!) sharing our lives with each other. According to Swedish TV channel SVT, Heja Livet is the third biggest Swedish all-female Facebook group. Why should you be part of a female network? The idea of Heja Livet is to prove wrong that outdated idea of women not supporting each other. The two founders of the group, Emely Crona Stenberg and Caroline Levy, have a basic requirement for all posts and comments: no hateful or mean content allowed. As Emely an Caroline put it: “Constructive criticism? Sure. Hate? No”. Recently, something called The Wing …

Speak Out: A Million Women’s Voices

As we welcome in the new year, we also welcome a new family to the White House. On January 20th Donald Trump will be inaugurated the 45th President of the United States and it is scary. Throughout the campaign season and the weeks since the election, feminist communities around the nation have rallied together in a collective outcry against Donald Trump. In the past eighteen months we have seen him call women fat, ugly, pigs, dogs, losers, slobs, disgusting animals, and pieces of ass. We have seen him poke fun at menstruation and support lawmakers who want to take away our rights to our bodies. But we have not been silent. From blogs to Planned Parenthood donations, from art installations to painful conversations, we are building community. And for many Americans, that means joining the January 21st Women’s March on Washington where millions of women and allies will take to the streets in protest against the rhetoric of misogyny, homophobia, racism, and xenophobia perpetuated by our current President Elect. But what about the millions of …

Six Superb STEMinists You Need to Meet

When I think of famous women in STEM, Marie Curie immediately comes to mind, but I can’t think of too many after that. For a girl to succeed in STEM fields, she needs support and she needs role models. These six women are currently working in STEM fields ranging from outer-space to the science lab and even into the White House. “Environmental challenges have the power to deny equality of opportunity and hold back the progress of communities.”– Lisa P. Jackson Lisa P. Jackson is a chemical engineer who has devoted her life to protecting the environment as both a woman in STEM and politics. She worked at the EPA for sixteen years before joining the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and worked on land management rights. She became the Commissioner of Environmental Protection for New Jersey and focused on making sure generally ignored and disenfranchised communities had access to pollutant free air. And she reached out to multicultural communities to educate, inform and involve them in her environmental efforts. She was the head …

Potato Salad or Global Public Health: Invest in Something that Matters

I sat with Derek Fetzer, Co-Founder and Team Leader of Caring Crowd in a quaint café in the Johnson & Johnson headquarters during their Global Citizen Summit. He told me about the significance of this new crowdfunding platform and the various ways young leaders in the health sector can become involved. After explaining the purpose of Caring Crowd, he pointed out that Johnson & Johnson is genuinely invested as a sponsor and truly values the needs and wellbeing of those they serve. During his thirty second shark-tank-style pitch, he – the multimillion dollar investor – explained to me why I should donate to a Caring Crowd project. Among some of those reasons were: We are sponsored by Johnson & Johnson Health workers are passionate about their involvement The sole focus is global public health  All projects are registered 501 © 3 The projects on the Caring Crowd platform highlight the power of people working together to ensure the wellbeing of others. In his interview he talked about the easy process for individuals to apply as well …

A Smart Thing To Do: Data on Women in Higher Education & STEM

“When we talk about improving women’s lives, education is an issue that comes up over and over again as an equalizer, because when women and girls have access to an education, they can accomplish anything.” – United State of Women But do all forms of education create equity where gender disparities are greatest? Although we need to work toward improving women’s and girls’ access to education on all levels, real disparities deepen in secondary and higher education environments around the world. Significant progress has been made as 2/3 of developing nations have achieved gender parity when it comes to access to primary education. Despite significant progress made on girls’ school enrollment in the past decade, 32 million girls of lower secondary school age were out of school in developing countries. The situation is worst for the poorest rural girls in South and West Asia: only 13% complete lower secondary school. If we agree with UNICEF that educating girls is “both an intrinsic right and a critical lever to reaching other development objectives,” then advocating for a higher output …

Men Must Be Part of the Solution – Sharing Realities from Uganda to the United States

By Priyanka Ghosh, Manager, Communications and Marketing, EngenderHealth The annual Social Good Summit is always an event I’d catch online, but this year was different because I had the opportunity to attend in-person, and it did not disappoint. One of the great sessions that I attended was the Social Good Master Class, which offered some great insight into the role of men and boys in family planning. The class is an opportunity for global bloggers and development practitioners to learn from thought leaders who “defied norms to make a difference.” The session was entitled “Family Planning: Not Just for Women” and focused on the need to engage men and boys as clients, partners, and agents of change to achieve global sexual and reproductive health goals and equality. Here are some highlights: Elman Nsinda, journalist, citizen activist, and member of the White Ribbon Alliance from Uganda, sparked the conversation by sharing a recent incident in Uganda when a man refused to pay a medical center 50,000 Ugandan shillings (around $20 USD) to help his wife, who …

Letter to A Young Girl

This letter is written by a young woman to her earlier self whose career is about to take a huge transformation. In this letter, she reflects on which characteristics and attitudes she wishes to retain and what she hopes to accomplish as she progresses forward to achieving her medical dreams. She also hopes that it will inspire other girls to go confidently as they pursue their scientific careers. Dear Me, I hope you’re well. I cannot tell you what you will encounter in the next four years, the people who will change your life, the experiences that will leave an ingrained memory in your brain. A lot of questions flood my mind as I think about the journey you will go through: Do you still keep your sense of poetry? Your creative writing? Does the idea of taking care of another human being terrify you? Do you still give humorous lectures of how things work in the molecular world? Do you still only eat fish and vegetables just to keep your mental faculties sane? (Please do relax sometimes! And …