All posts tagged: Family Planning

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Knowledge and Perception about Family Planning by Women in Uganda

Blog post by Sylvester Nnyombi, Content Guru, Reach A Hand, Uganda Phoebe Nabaweesa* was 22 years when she decided to try a family planning option mid last year. She zeroed in on the injection primarily because she had observed its impact on her best friend for quite some time. Most of which was positive- at least as far as she was concerned. Phoebe’s friend had a good appetite, gained weight and was having sex without getting pregnant. Phoebe went to a clinic in Konge, one of the suburbs of Kampala, with a preset mind to receive the injection. Parting with 4,000UGX (Approx. $1) she received it, and that’s when all hell broke loose. “I had a constant flow of blood from the time I got the injection. It was like having my period every day for three months!” the 23-year old factory worker in Konge narrates. Having seen the blood flow for a month, she returned to the health facility, this time seeking medical attention. The attendants tactfully told her that the body needed time to get …

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Men Must Be Part of the Solution – Sharing Realities from Uganda to the United States

By Priyanka Ghosh, Manager, Communications and Marketing, EngenderHealth The annual Social Good Summit is always an event I’d catch online, but this year was different because I had the opportunity to attend in-person, and it did not disappoint. One of the great sessions that I attended was the Social Good Master Class, which offered some great insight into the role of men and boys in family planning. The class is an opportunity for global bloggers and development practitioners to learn from thought leaders who “defied norms to make a difference.” The session was entitled “Family Planning: Not Just for Women” and focused on the need to engage men and boys as clients, partners, and agents of change to achieve global sexual and reproductive health goals and equality. Here are some highlights: Elman Nsinda, journalist, citizen activist, and member of the White Ribbon Alliance from Uganda, sparked the conversation by sharing a recent incident in Uganda when a man refused to pay a medical center 50,000 Ugandan shillings (around $20 USD) to help his wife, who …

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An Interview with Wale Adeleye, a Youth Champion for RMNCH in Nigeria

Rise Up is pleased to launch our Impact Blog Series for the Women Deliver conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. This series highlights the work of two Champions for Change (C4C) leaders in Nigeria and one Youth Champions Initiative (YCI) leader from India. C4C’s Champions in Nigeria are working together to save the lives of mothers, children and young women through innovative advocacy and leadership development. YCI’s Champion in India is working to lead the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement for the next generation. This series brings a diversity of perspectives to the table to discuss their critical work in driving the progress in maternal, sexual, and reproductive health and rights, as well as sharing the impact they have made through partnerships, awareness raising, and innovation. We are featuring an interactive discussion with Francesca Adeola Abiola of Action Health Inc., an NGO in Nigeria dedicated to promoting young people’s health and development to ensure their successful transition to healthy and productive adulthood; Wale Adeleye of Civil Society for Family Planning, an NGO in Nigeria dedicated …

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How Activists and Organizations are Using Social Media to Promote Family Planning

By Luke Nozicka and Jennifer Gonzalez / Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting When Imali Ngusale hosts social media discussions about sex and family planning, to inform people about subjects they are not exposed to at home or in school, she often uses numbers and codes to keep the conversation under wraps. “We do this because when it goes to social media … somebody may need to find out where they can get youth friendly services — and if their parents or relatives are following them, you want to make it discreet,” Ngusale said of the online chats, which usually consist of more than 100 curious youths who use Twitter to talk about reproductive health. “It is an innovative way to be discreet but also cool.” Ngusale, a 27-year-old social media strategist who works for the Centre for the Study of Adolescence in Nairobi, Kenya, said she has to do “some very good ground work” before each discussion, emailing people to inform them when conversations will occur and what code words will be used. “You can create meaning through different trends,” she said. Ngusale was …

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Youth and Family Planning: Include Us at the Table

By Luke Nozicka and Jennifer Gonzalez / Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting Numerous topics regarding sexual advocacy and education, from contraceptive use to abortions, were discussed at the International Conference on Family Planning in late January. And while experts flew to Nusa Dua, Indonesia, from all over the world, there was one general consensus: world leaders must include youth in conversations and decisions about family planning. “It is so important … to engage in open dialogue with young people in general and ensure that their voices are heard and that they are included — not as tokens, not as examples of ‘OK, let’s find the youth who can speak for two minutes’ — but really link, leverage, integrate and create ownership,” Katja Iversen, CEO of Women Deliver, said during a panel she led with a handful of young leaders. From SM Shaikat, a 26-year-old youth adviser who created an anti-dowry awareness program in Bangladesh, to Patrick Segawa, who founded a youth-led community organization that seeks to address sexual and reproductive issues in Uganda, hundreds of young people came to the fourth annual conference to make their voices …

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The Diary of an Indian sex-educator

Her: “Is it possible for you to talk on menstruation and child sexual abuse to young girls?” Me: “Sure! What age are they?” Her: “Studying in Class 5 and 6.” Me: “Great! That shouldn’t be a problem.” Her: “There is one thing though, you can’t talk about sex.” Awkward silence followed. I had no choice but to agree. This was my first encounter with sex-ed. I had been working with a feminist organisation in Hyderabad for a year already. I was 24 years old. I trained on legal rights, human rights and legislations but had not started training on sex, sexuality or reproductive health, for that matter. Those were reserved for experienced trainers. The above conversation was merely an introduction to the long list of conditions sex educators must work with. To prepare for this class in a private school in a posh part of the city, I spent two weeks reading. I read about the human body. I studied how the parts looked. I read books for kids, for adults, for trainers, for teachers …

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CDC’s Infographic and the Double Standard of Behavior

  A man has a beer and is featured in TV commercials. He’s cool, he’s “one of the guys.” But time and time again, women are called out, shamed, and even blamed for the behavior of others for doing the same thing. In 2013, Hong Kong Security Secretary Lai Tung-kwok appealed to young ladies to stop drinking too much because of the increase in rape cases. The Missoula Montana Police Department has a history of blaming rape victims for alcohol use, and Crimewatch creator Nick Ross suggested that “not all rape is rape” when the victim is drunk. Now, the U.S. Center for Disease Control (CDC) has released this infographic in their monthly Vital Signs report. The CDC infographic intends to prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). As the CDC states, “alcohol use during pregnancy, even within the first few weeks and before a woman knows she is pregnant, can cause lasting physical, behavioral, and intellectual disabilities that can last for a child’s lifetime.” Understanding the harmful effects of alcohol during pregnancy and even the …

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Zika Virus: The hypocrisy of telling women to delay pregnancy

Featured image: Marcos Freitas/Flickr, Creative Commons If you’ve been paying attention to the news, you’ve probably seen headlines about the Zika virus outbreak which began in Brazil and is now spreading to other countries in Latin America. The virus is spread through mosquito bites, and common symptoms of the disease include rash and joint pain. The disease is usually mild, and rarely requires hospital treatment. That is, unless you’re a pregnant woman. After the outbreak in Brazil, authorities have reported numerous cases where the virus has caused severe malformalities in babies whose mothers were infected while pregnant, including microcephaly, which is a condition where the baby is born with an abnormally small head and severe brain damage. As a result several countries in the region, including Brazil, El Salvador, Jamaica, Colombia and Honduras, have urged women not to get pregnant and advised foreign pregnant women against traveling to the region until further notice. El Salvador’s Deputy Health Minister has taken the most extreme stance so far – urging women in El Salvador to postpone pregnancy until 2018. Advising …

MATERNAL & INFANT MORTALITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

ICFP 2016: Family planning as a human right

Featured image: UN Photo/Kibae Park On the shuttle bus from the airport I sat between a young woman from India and a young woman from Zimbabwe. Having traveled from three different corners of world, we all arrived ready to share our family planning knowledge and experiences while learning from others at the Fourth International Conference on Family Planning (ICFP). The United Nations recognizes family planning as a human right and this week activists, advocates, humanitarians, health practitioners, private sector representatives and scholars from across the globe are together in Nusa Dua, Indonesia to discuss how this human right can go from being a lofty goal to a global norm. At the heart of family planning is a woman’s right to choose whether or not  and with whom she will have children, as well as her right to control the timing, spacing and number of children she chooses to have. At this conference, we are reflecting on the challenges and opportunities in providing girls and women with access to this human right. As part of looking at and …

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About FP: Future Planning for Young People

On November 7, 2015 I will have had my current contraceptive implant for exactly two years. I love my implant, to say the least!  I got my implant put in after I gave birth to my lovely daughter, who is now 2 years old. What this has meant for me and my partner is that we now live our lives with self-determination and bodily autonomy. More importantly, I do not take it for granted that I am able to access contraceptives. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 225 million women in developing countries would like to delay or stop childbearing but are not using any method of contraception. Young people are busy planning for brighter futures and not necessarily for families. Contraception provides us with the security and stability to enjoy a satisfying life. By Definition Contraception refers to the prevention of pregnancy as a consequence of sexual intercourse through the use of artificial methods or other techniques. When used correctly and persistently, contraceptive use in developing countries have been shown to decrease …