All posts tagged: MDGs

SDG 7: Access To Energy Can Lead To Gender Equity

At this time last year, the progress of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) was being analyzed as their 15-year stretch was coming to a close. As I contribute to the Girls’ Globe coverage of the launch of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) this year, I think back on an article I wrote about MDG 4: Reduction of child mortality. ​The MDGs were launched in 2000, and projected to be accomplished by 2015. Last year, I wrote about how we failed to meet the targets for MDG 4 . The UN update on MDG 4 explained that, “Despite determined global progress in reducing child deaths, an increasing proportion of child deaths are in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. Four out of every five deaths of children under age five occur in these regions.” A few questions arose for me upon hearing about the roll out of the SDGs: “Are we just throwing the MDGs by the wayside?” and “Will the SDGs be treated in the same way; if they fail, they will be forgotten in 2030?” Through reading …

MDG 6: Succeeding targets on HIV/AIDS and failing women and girls

By Bergen Cooper, Senior Policy Research Associate, Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE) The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are coming to a close. As we look back at accomplishments and missed opportunities in the MDGs—and prepare for the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)—we know that global action works, but not for everyone. MDG 6, for example, was created to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. The targets include halting and reversing the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015, universal access to treatment for HIV/AIDS by 2010, and halting and reversing the incidence of malaria by 2015. Let’s start with the good news. We achieved halting and reversing the spread of HIV/AIDS. Let’s continue with the good news. New HIV infections declined by 40 percent from 2000-2013. Fifteen million people living with HIV are on antiretroviral therapy, a goal that was met nine months early. This is compared to the only 1 million people who were on antiretroviral therapies in 2000. New HIV infections have fallen by 35 percent in the general population, and 59 percent …

Building on 15 Years of Progress

By Alexandra Cairns, External Affairs Manager, Kupona Foundation For anyone studying, working in, or interested in global development, this week will be monumental. The framework upon which the development community built 15 years of programing, funding strategies and advocacy is shifting. A new set of targets has dominated the discourse for the last 9 months, and will continue to do so until 2030: SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) will replace the MDGs (Millennium Development Goals), renewing our focus on long term, scalable solutions for the many challenges facing the development and prosperity of global communities. At Kupona Foundation, we believe that people and communities need to be empowered to realize their full potential, and build productive futures. This starts with improving their access to healthcare. Healthy people can work, go to school, and care for their families. Access to quality healthcare has a ripple effect, amplifying positive impact across communities. We are encouraged by the themes and conversations surrounding the UN General Assembly and associated events this week: safe surgery, mobile innovations in maternal health, and …

MDG 5: Moms still need our help, especially in rural areas

By Kristyn Zalota, Founder of CleanBirth.org As we approach the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, it is clear that many countries will not achieve the 75% reduction in maternal mortality prescribed by MGD Goal 5.  According to the World Bank, “…of all the MDGs, the least progress has been made toward the maternal health goal.” The good news is there has been 45%
 drop in maternal mortality between 1990-2013 with the rate of maternal deaths shrinking from 380 per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 210 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2013. There is consensus that future efforts must be focused on women in developing countries. 99% of the 800 women who die each day due to birth-related complications live in the developing world. Just 50%
of women in developing areas receive sufficient antenatal care. More than 24% women/girls in sub-Saharan Africa lack family planning services, leading to unplanned pregnancies and HIV. We also now know that within developing countries, there are often disparities in maternal care between rural and urban areas. UNDP finds, …

MDG4 Progress: Saving Our Little Saviors

A nation’s future is built upon its children. Early childhood development is considered to be the most important phase which determines the overall wellbeing across the individual’s lifespan. Investing in children translates into saving our world from the countless ills that plague society today. 15 years ago, the world made a promise in the form of Millennium Development Goal 4 to reduce the global under-five mortality rate by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015 as our leaders agreed on the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). We have now reached the end of the era of the MDGs, and the world has come together to make a new promise in the form of a new set of goals for the coming 15 years. In that respect, it is important to take a closer look at how well we did in our strive to uphold our promise; and approach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with a renewed sense of commitment. We should acknowledge that we have come a long way. According to the 2015 Levels and Trends in Child …

Girls’ Globe at UN General Assembly – Join us!

The 70th Session of the United Nations General Assembly formally began on 15 September 2015 – and this year is different and unique. This year, the world comes together to say goodbye to the eight Millennium Development Goals which were adopted in 1990 for 15 years, and say hello to the new 17 Sustainable Development Goals, which will set the new global development agenda for the entire world from now until 2030. Much can be said about the MDGs and whether or not they succeeded in what they set out to do – we’ve seen great success stories, and notable failures. We’ve learned about setting targets and defining indicators, and we’ve understood the importance of ensuring that we don’t only focus on countries reaching certain thresholds and targets, but also pay attention to whether their progress and development is even and equal and reaches those who are most in need, and often the hardest to reach. Girls’ Globe will be present at UNGA with our key partners, FHI360, Johnson & Johnson, and Women Deliver, focusing particularly on …

From MDGs to SDGs: Stepping into the World We Want

In Africa, there is a common phrase that says, “When the drummers change their beat, the dancers must change their steps.” In September, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are set to be adopted by Heads of States at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA). This meeting will bring together developed and developing countries, politicians, private sector leaders, civil society organizations, faith groups and others to adopt a set of 17 goals that aim to  take forward the job that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set in motion by intensifying action to empower the poorest and the hardest to reach. Will the global community be dancing to a new beat that will truly be transformative and have a positive impact on the lives of women and girls or will the new development agenda play out like a broken record? The following are a few reflections of the proposed 2030 agenda: Looking Back – What Worked The MDGs have been praised for being useful tool in providing benchmarks for the achievement of special development gains, for priority …

Why Are Youth Voices Around the World So Valuable?

Insight for the article provided by Nick Oketch As a college student passionate about empowering youth and improving conditions in developing countries, I have thought about the ways and means to making a difference. I asked myself, “How can I, personally, make a difference to help create sustainable change?” I brainstormed about what areas needed the most attention. My thoughts and ideas grew out of information I had come across, articles read, conversations with people who worked in NGOs, and on my experiences from a volunteer trip to Tanzania two years ago. When Girl’s Globe launched their #YouthVoices campaign, I suddenly understood that I was not thinking about igniting change in the best, most efficient way possible. I was basing my ideas off of only my personal experiences and own education. I realized that even though I had great intentions, if I wanted to make positive change for youth around the world, I would be required to speak and engage with the youth directly. Who better to ask about changes for youth than the youth themselves? …

Jacaranda Health: Making Pregnancy and Childbirth Safer for Women in Kenya

I t’s a big month for women’s health and rights as advocates and world leaders gathered earlier in March at the UN in New York City to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the 1995 Beijing World Conference on Women; and the Beijing Platform for Action which gave rise to actions to improve the lives of women and girls around the world. The platform highlighted 12 key areas to address. Why are these issues important to Jacaranda Health? One of those areas is “Women and Health” because, as UN Women notes, “Women need to be healthy in order to realize their full potential.” It’s been repeated many times but 289,000 women die every year from complications related to pregnacy and childbirth; most of those complications (including postpartum hemorrhage, and high-blood pressure during pregnancy) are preventable with access to skilled health providers and an improvement in the quality of care currently accessible to most women in developing countries.  Jacaranda Health builds maternity hospitals for these women and newborns and offers patient-centered, respectful, high quality health care from pregnancy through to postpartum (including …

The Story of My Daughter’s Birth

Originally published on Huffington Post It felt like I was in a movie — one of those scenes where the woman in labor screams in pain and squirms as each contraction kicks in. Never had I imagined that giving birth would feel like a thin line between life and death — both for me and my baby. My pregnancy was a good one. Besides the first trimester’s spells of nausea, I had a great summer, with the possibility to both work, travel and enjoy life to the fullest. As my due date came and went, I tried to stay active, sleep a lot and prepare for the storm ahead. Twelve days passed, and I didn’t have the slightest notion that my baby wanted to enter the “real” world — yet that evening around dinnertime, I felt the first sign of labor. My contractions came quickly. In the comfort of my home, I tackled the first hour without a problem — but after those 60 minutes, I already had one-minute-long contractions every five minutes. I contacted …