All posts tagged: Newborn Health

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World Prematurity Day 2016 – The Simplest of Interventions that Saves Lives

Each year more than 15 million babies are born prematurely, many of whom die within their first few days of life. Today, on World Prematurity Day 2016, we are shedding light on one of the most effective, yet basic interventions: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC). With exclusive breastfeeding being one of its essential components, this method has the potential to save the lives of babies born prematurely. This week, in connection with World Prematurity Day, Save the Children announced that representatives of major international and U.S. associations for health professionals will come together and endorse a joint statement recommending the universal use of KMC for all preterm and low birth weight infants. So, what does Kangaroo Mother Care entail and why do we need it? KMC is a method of care practiced on newborn children – usually preterm (born before 37 weeks of pregnancy), low birthweight infants – where the mother, father or another carer functions as a natural incubator, providing heat, stimulation and feeding to the baby. The newborn, only wearing a nappy and a …

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Why Men’s Involvement in Safeguarding Maternal Health Is Critical!

This post was written by Elman Nsinda, journalist and maternal health advocate, White Ribbon Alliance Uganda (nsindae (at ) gmail.com) In Uganda, 17 women and 106 newborns die every day due to complications related to pregnancy and child birth. Unfortunately, the causes of these deaths are clearly known and could be averted if each of the parties responsible played their part. The causes of death include: Severe bleeding, sepsis, obstructed labor, Hypertensive Disorders among others, exacerbated by delays at both community and at facility levels. Pregnancy comes as a result of a moment of enjoyment by a couple; man and woman. This means therefore that the two are equally responsible for the outcome and the results whether negative or positive, should be equally shared by the two. The death of a woman as result of complications related to pregnancy and child birth, leaving the husband to remarry, will justifiably show injustice to the woman. I am a father of two, and during pregnancy for the two children, I provided good food for the mother’s nutrition, …

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Four ways we’re making progress toward the Global Goals

This week marks the first anniversary of the launch of the Global Goals. As the global development community convenes in New York City for the United Nations’ General Assembly week, what better time to reflect on progress? In a country where, on average, one woman will die every hour from mostly preventable complications in pregnancy or childbirth1, Tanzania is one of the most dangerous places in the world to give birth. The good news: thanks to your support and the dedicated team on the ground, lives are being saved. We are making progress toward the Global Goals. 1. Empowering Medical Teams to Save Lives. Dar es Salaam is one of the largest, and fastest growing cities in Africa, with a population projected to exceed 7 million by 20252. Today, a healthcare system designed to support 750,000 people is supporting 4.4 million. Hospitals and clinics throughout the region are severely overcrowded, understaffed, and under resourced, with patients suffering as a result. Our sister organization, CCBRT, recognized that healthcare teams in the Dar es Salaam region were …

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The 2030 Promise: Multi-sector Partnerships Vital to Advancing Human Health

Johnson & Johnson strives to make a significant impact on people’s lives. After the new Sustainable Development Goals were adopted, JNJ has focused its efforts on galvanizing partners, mobilizing employees and engaging communities with the goal of impacting millions of more lives within the next 15 years. Johnson & Johnson has showed steadfast commitment to advancing human health at the 71st Session of the United Nations General Assembly and hosted a side event titled: “A Roadmap to Advance Human Health: Catalyzing Multi-sector Partnerships in an interconnected SDG Agenda”, aimed at showcasing Johnson & Johnson’s commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals and addressing how the commitments would be measured. This commitment, titled “2030 Promise”, outlines JNJ’s vision for 2030 and the five areas JNJ will focus their efforts on. These are: Environmental Health Global Disease Challenges Essential Surgery Women’s and Children’s Health Health Workforce Johnson & Johnson’s aspiration is to help create a world where every woman and child survives and has an opportunity for a healthy future, and to do this, JNJ’s goal is to ensure that 60 million …

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Midwife By Choice, Not By Chance

This post was written by George Nkhoma. My name is George Nkhomo and I work as a nurse and midwife in the rural district of Chitipa in Malawi.  I grew up as a house boy, not knowing my real family. Then, after searching for my roots I learned that my mother died while giving birth to me. At that point I knew I wanted to do something to help other mothers and ultimately decided to become a midwife. I have been committed to make a difference for other mothers and babies ever since. Malawian Midwives are among the most passionate and hardworking midwives in the world. In my District, most health centres operate with one midwife per facility. Most of these are dual qualified, which means they single handedly deliver all nursing and midwifery services to the whole catchment population. This means that providing services day and night, all month round, all year round is entirely his or her call. I am yet to know of another profession – in Malawi or beyond – that …

MATERNAL & INFANT MORTALITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Sisterhood Unfulfilled: A Story of Unspeakable Loss

This blog post is the first of a three part series written by: Abby Tseggai Almost everyone knows a woman who has brought a baby into the world- and how expecting families share a similar joy, full of optimism and big dreams as they anxiously wait to hold their little baby. It is easy to forget in all the excitement that the possibility of an unfathomable reality—the death of a child—can actually occur. I want to share with you a very personal story of girl named Fana, from Eritrea. At the tender age of seven years old, she and her family experienced a tragedy that was only the beginning of decades of havoc to follow. Fana’s little sister, died unexpectedly at just five years old from an illness unknown. The emotional trauma Fana experienced stemmed in part from losing her baby sister – but mostly, it came from having to witness her mother grieve for most of her life. Her mother’s pain and depression was so severe that she struggled to be mentally and emotionally present …

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What Happens to Community Projects after Organizations Leave?

Post Written By Annemijn Sondaal “It’s not a drug, it’s not a vaccine, it’s not a device. It’s women, working together, solving problems, saving lives” -Richard Horton, editor-in-chief of the Lancet, May 2013 Participatory women’s groups all over the world have created spaces for women to engage in dialogue, exchange their ideas and experiences and spur them to take action to improve their community’s health. The Institute of Global Health, University College London and its’ partners including Women and Children First, have shown that participatory women’s groups can, with participation of at least a third of pregnant women, cut maternal deaths in half and newborn deaths by over a third. Women’s groups are run and attended by local women (and sometimes men), mobilising local resources to address local problems. This type of capacity-building and community-mobilising intervention is perhaps the most likely to sustain after the supporting organisation leaves, but organisations rarely investigate the long-term effect of interventions or their sustainability. This means that little is known about optimal times and methods to withdraw support, the capacities needed, and support mechanisms necessary …

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#9 – Maternal Health, Breastfeeding and Women’s Rights

In this episode of The Mom Pod, Julia has conversations about innovations and interventions that make a real difference for maternal and newborn health and the linkage to women’s rights with Jerker Liljestrand, Senior Program Officer for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and Roger Mathisen, Program Director for Alive & Thrive in Southeast Asia. At the Women Deliver 2016 conference there was a lot of talk about new innovations that lead development forward to improve maternal, newborn and child health. When asked about what innovations can make a major difference and be brought to scale, Jerker Liljestrand spoke about women’s rights – their freedom, mobility, and having access to information and opportunities for dialogue. Further, Jerker spoke about the work that the Gates Foundation does to improve maternal, newborn and child health around the world, and what impact they have achieved. As an obstetrician and gynecologist with experience from many different parts of the world, he also provided some tips to mothers about how they can demand quality care. “It’s …

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Midwives Inspire In All Corners of the World

The Nordic Midwifery Congress took place earlier in May, where hundreds of midwives and other researchers have presented their latest scientific findings on everything from health during pregnancy, childbirth procedures, sexual and reproductive health and rights, domestic violence, and more. Speakers have inspired others through their action and their passion to ensure that every woman has access to evidence-based care and a midwife who listens, supports and provides the care that every woman needs. We had the opportunity to speak to a few midwives who have in various ways dedicated their time to ensure that women in low resource settings have access to a midwife. Vivian Wahlberg was the first midwife in Sweden and in the entire Nordic region to get a PhD. She has since then dedicated her life to improving midwifery practice and the health of mothers and babies around the world. Each year, Wahlberg gives out a stipend to midwives in Sweden, who want to further their research to improve the wellbeing of mothers and babies. Listen to Wahlberg describe her impact and why …

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A Conversation About Mom’s Superpowers with Mariam Claeson, Gates Foundation

In this Mother’s Day Special, The Mom Pod co-host Julia Wiklander asks some very important questions to an expert in the field of maternal, newborn and child health, Mariam Claeson, Director, Maternal Newborn and Child Health at Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The focus of this conversation is all mother’s superpowers and the simple, cost effective interventions that save lives and ensure that mothers and babies survive and thrive. “The interesting thing about maternal and newborn survival is that we actually have high impact interventions that are relatively low cost and could easily be made available for all mothers and newborns.” Mariam Claeson Mariam speaks about the evidence that scientists and clinicians have known for a long time and the need for that evidence to be communicated and disseminated to health professionals, mothers, families and communities around the world. She talks about these simple solutions that all mothers can do and the role that we all have to play to create an enabling environment where mothers can thrive and ensure that their superpowers come to life. Our hope is …