All posts tagged: teenage pregnancy

#InvestInUGchildren Media Tour: Teenage Pregnancy in Arua District, Uganda

It’s a humid Saturday morning when we arrive at Bondo Health center in our air-conditioned land rovers to have a meeting with health workers, teenage mothers and community members. I enter the stuffy metal tin roofed meeting room a little late, and find everyone settled on concrete benches. All eyes are on a young pregnant woman in the corner, I realise as the discussion is going on that she is not really a full grown adult woman, she is a pregnant teenage girl. Her hands are shaking, she can barely get a word out of her mouth. Her eyes keep darting around the room looking for help. Anyone would feel nervous too, imagine sitting in a room full of strangers while they ask you, “How could you allow yourself to get pregnant?” “Will you be returning to school once you’ve had the baby?” It must be too overwhelming for a young girl like her, and I doubt she ever considered the consequences of her pregnancy. We continue to ask our questions as though we understand …

Teenage Mothers in Developing Countries Need Support

As I was reading the blog entry “Teenage Pregnancy: What to do about it”, I was brought back to a familiar place, a time when I became a young mother. Although I got pregnant with my son at 18 and was a junior in college, I still faced the same stigma and shame as Brianna. As a young woman born and raised in a developing country, though living in the United States, the social consequences of getting pregnant became real. According to the World Health Organization, the vast majority of births that occur worldwide to girls aged 15-19 years old occur in low and middle income countries. The average global birth rate is 49 per 1000 girls among 15-19 years old with country rates ranging from 1 to 299 per 1000 girls. Often times, girls drop out of or are barred from school and are kicked out of their homes because of the stigma associated with becoming pregnant. Far too often teenage mothers are ignored and left to raise children by themselves with no support. …

Teenage Pregnancy: Still a Great Killer of Teenage Girls in Kenya

Reproductive health and rights have been conceptualized under several human rights instruments that Kenya has ratified. These instruments seek to entrench gender equality by stemming out discrimination against women and guaranteeing comprehensive rights to women including to control their reproductive health and to put an end to female genital mutilation. In spite of these instruments, abortion is restricted in Kenya and only applies in very limited situations, that is, where the continuation of the pregnancy poses a threat to the life of the woman. All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights and thereby every human being has a right to life. This right is safeguarded by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) which states that no one shall be subjected to torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Teenage pregnancy remains the biggest killer of teenage girls in the developing world. Young women aged 15 to 19 are twice as likely to die from complications in pregnancy as compared to older women. The chances of death in the first year …